Reflections on our Community Shavuot Tikun and Jewish Unity -by Rabbi Hyim Shafner

This past Tuesday night, the first night of Shavuot, over 100 people from five different shuls and institutions, Reform, Conservative and Orthodox, came together  to spend the night (some even made it all night!)  learning Torah together; to stand again as we did at Sinai, no matter our differences, as “one person with one heart”.

Classes ranged from Pirkey Avot, to Jewish mysticism, to Midrash.  Jews who rarely pray together and might not share the same visions of how Jewish observance should look none the less placed those differences aside in light of the big picture –that we are all one.  As Richard Joel, the president of Yeshiva University often used to say regarding the Jewish people, “One size does not fit all.”  Yet at the same time it is imperative I think that we are able at times to put aside those different “sizes” and be one people learning Torah together -especially on Shavuot.  As the Midrash says, “The Jewish people came together as one person with one heart in order to receive the Torah with love.”  According to the Midrash the Torah must be received in love and this is only possible if the Jewish people can, even if only for one day, see each other as wholly unified.

Some people in the Orthodox community have asked me how I can allow teachers who do not share Orthodox views of Torah or observance to teach at Bais Abraham on Shavuot.   I do not believe it is forbidden to read or hear what other Jews believe and often I find they have much to teach us.   I have not once had any of my congregants tell me they considered not being Orthodox from hearing a non-orthodox rabbi speak on Shavuot at my shul.   I have faith that the Torah is true and can protect itself.

I was once discussing our annual community Shavuot Tikun with the head of an Israeli yeshiva and that some people have been critical of this interdenominational learning since they were afraid of having teachers teach who were not Orthodox in belief or observance.  His reply was: “They should be afraid of being too afraid”.

What does indeed come from the annual Shavuot Tikun, thank G-d, is a deep sense of the unity of Klal Yisrael (the Jewish people).

One Response to Reflections on our Community Shavuot Tikun and Jewish Unity -by Rabbi Hyim Shafner

  1. Michael Stein says:

    I admire Rabbi Shafner’s willingness to learn with Klal Yisrael, specifically on Shavuot. Revelation was a threatening and scary thing — to retreat to safe ground and only listen to people we know we’ll agree with — that’s not opening ourselves up nearly as effectively.

    Rabbi Shafner is correct both in principle — we should be open minded and not arrogant, and we have much to learn from everyone — and he is correct tactically — Orthodox Jews leave for Conservative and Reform Judaism less frequently than the opposite occurs. Furthermore, the power and beauty of an observant life speaks for itself.

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